First people in America didn’t arrive by land bridge but by SEA

0

The first people to move to America came by sea rather than over a land bridge, according to a new study, which found that a giant 3,000-foot-high wall of ice blocked their way.

For a long time, there have been two main theories about how humans first migrated to North America — over a landmass called Beringia that once connected Asia to North America, or by traveling along the Pacific coast in small watercraft from Asia.

Whether they traveled overland to North America depends on whether Beringia actually had an ice-free corridor, allowing travel to the Great Plains.

A footprint and stone artifacts discovered by scientists suggest the first humans arrived in what is now New Mexico about 23,000 years ago, and in central Mexico 26,500 years ago.

To find out whether they came by land or sea, a team from Oregon State University set out to find out exactly when the ice-free corridor opened.

They found that the corridor wasn’t fully open until about 13,800 years ago, with ice sheets up to 3,000 feet high where the corridor would later appear, meaning that — because humans arrived more than 10,000 years earlier — they must have arrived by sea.

Those first migrants, attempting to cross over land, are said to have encountered a Game of Thrones-esque wall of ice taller than the world’s tallest building, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, which stands at 2,722 feet, forcing the crossing. is impossible.

The first people to move to America came by sea rather than over a land bridge, according to a new study, and a massive 3,000-foot wall of ice blocked their way

The first people to move to America came by sea rather than over a land bridge, according to a new study, and a massive 3,000-foot wall of ice blocked their way

For a long time, there have been two main theories about how humans first migrated to North America — over a landmass called Beringia that once connected Asia to North America, or by traveling along the Pacific coast in small watercraft from Asia.  stock image

For a long time, there have been two main theories about how humans first migrated to North America — over a landmass called Beringia that once connected Asia to North America, or by traveling along the Pacific coast in small watercraft from Asia.  stock image

For a long time, there have been two main theories about how humans first migrated to North America — over a landmass called Beringia that once connected Asia to North America, or by traveling along the Pacific coast in small watercraft from Asia. stock image

The study is the latest in a series of studies that disregard the long-held “Clovis First” theory, which says humans first arrived in the Americas from Siberia along an ice-free inland corridor formed after the last ice age.

This corridor is said to have run along the eastern front of the Rocky Mountains, but how early it opened is questionable — casting doubt on the Clovis First theory.

The research team – led by Jorie Clark of Oregon State University and including Dr. Dylan Rood and Louise Guillaume of Imperial College London – discovered that the corridor between the two ice sheets did not fully open until about 13,800 years ago.

This is when the two ice sheets that covered much of North America during the last ice age melted and retreated north.

Previous studies of early stone tools found in the Americas, dating back 13,400 years, led archaeologists to believe that the Clovis people were the first migrants from Asia to North America, but this idea is widely disputed.

This roughly matches the dates placed on the opening of the ice sheet corridor, but recent archaeological digs have found many earlier remains in North America.

These were from pre-Clovis civilizations, with a 2021 study of 60 ancient footprints in New Mexico dating human presence to 23,000 years ago, and a 2020 study finding evidence of artifacts in central Mexico from 26,500 years ago.

“We now have robust evidence that the ice-free corridor was not open and available to America’s first humans,” Clark said.

To find out whether they came by land or sea, the Oregon State University team and others set out to find out exactly when the ice-free corridor opened.

To find out whether they came by land or sea, the Oregon State University team and others set out to find out exactly when the ice-free corridor opened.

To find out whether they came by land or sea, the Oregon State University team and others set out to find out exactly when the ice-free corridor opened.

To pinpoint the exact opening of the ice-free corridor, Clark and his team examined 64 geological samples from six sites spanning 745 miles.

This was along the zone that the corridor is thought to have existed, and included boulders that glaciers would have carried from their original homes.

The team looked at how long the rocks had been exposed to the surface and how long they had been sitting on the ground without ice cover.

“We used a method known as cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating, which is a ‘rock clock’ that essentially tells us how long rocks have been on the Earth’s surface — after a glacier has retreated and left them and exposed them, for example,” says Louise Guillaume.

They found that the ice-free corridor didn’t open properly until 13,800 years ago, with ice sheets blocking the entrance to 300 feet high.

To locate the exact opening of the ice-free corridor, Clark and his team examined 64 geological samples from six sites spanning 745 miles.

To locate the exact opening of the ice-free corridor, Clark and his team examined 64 geological samples from six sites spanning 745 miles.

To locate the exact opening of the ice-free corridor, Clark and his team examined 64 geological samples from six sites spanning 745 miles.

This puts it slightly more recent than other studies, suggesting it opened 15,000 years ago, although the team stated the time it was “fully open.”

The team is not saying that people didn’t make it through the corridor, just that it would be impossible for the first wave of migrants to arrive that way.

Clark said other waves may have taken the more direct ice-free route once the corridor opened, “but again, we need to find archaeological sites in the ice-free corridor to assess when they came down.”

dr. Dylan Rood, co-author of the study from Imperial College London said: “We closed the door on the ice-free corridor. This research makes it clear that the corridor would not have been available as a migratory route back when people first entered America like this” n 2000 years earlier, putting the Clovis First theory to rest.”

WHO WERE THE CLOVIS PEOPLE?

The Clovis people, a prehistoric Native American group of hunter-gatherers, reached North America about 13,500 years ago.

They hunted mammoths, mastodons and giant bison with large spears.

Clovis artifacts are distinctive prehistoric stone tools so named because they were first found near Clovis, New Mexico, in the 1920s.

They have since been identified throughout the Americas.

These early humans were distinguished for the finely fluted stone points they made for weapons.

Centuries of cold, nicknamed the ‘Big Freeze’, would have wiped out the Clovis, as well as most large mammals in North America

In recent years, however, archaeological evidence has increasingly questioned the idea that these people were the first to reach America.

Now, in the latest research to question this long-held theory, researchers led by Thomas Williams of Texas State University’s Department of Anthropology have excavated the Gault site northwest of Austin.

They found a collection of artifacts between 16,000 and 20,000 years old.

.