Hans Neimann loses quarterfinals of chess tournament after world champ Magnus Carlsen resigned

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American teenage chess player Hans Neimann lost in the quarterfinals on Thursday, ruling out the possibility of a dramatic rematch between cheating prodigy and world chess champion Magnus Carlsen.

Carlsen resigned after just one move during their final match amid rumors his opponent cheated with a vibrating anal sex toy.

However, a thrilling final between Carlsen, 31, and Neimann, 19, will not take place at the Julius Baer Generation Cup after the teenager lost to Le Quang Liem on Thursday.

The world chess champion has laughed at claims that Neimann used vibrating anal beads to cheat, but stunned chess fans when he resigned from a rematch against Niemann after just a single move in the online Julius Baer Generation Cup on September 19.

Niemann has furiously denied using vibrating anal beads to get tips on how to play. The teenage star said, “I’ve never cheated in an over-the-board game. If they want me to undress completely, I will.’

He unexpectedly defeated the world champion in a real battle for the Sinquefield Cup in St. Louis a month before the online tournament on Chess24.

Chess genius, Hans Niemann, 19, (pictured) lost in the quarterfinals of the Julius Baer Generation Cup on Thursday.  The teen had previously been accused by fans of cheating in a variety of different and imaginative ways, including using vibrating anal beads to communicate with his coach.

Chess genius, Hans Niemann, 19, (pictured) lost in the quarterfinals of the Julius Baer Generation Cup on Thursday. The teen had previously been accused by fans of cheating in a variety of different and imaginative ways, including using vibrating anal beads to communicate with his coach.

Any chance of a rematch against his rival Magnus Carlsen, 31 (pictured) - who dramatically resigned against Neimann in a previous match - will no longer be possible

Any chance of a rematch against his rival Magnus Carlsen, 31 (pictured) - who dramatically resigned against Neimann in a previous match - will no longer be possible

Any chance of a rematch against his rival Magnus Carlsen, 31 (pictured) – who dramatically resigned against Neimann in a previous match – will no longer be possible

The teenage chess star sparked rumors that he was cheating by using remote-controlled vibrating anal beads to communicate with his coach, Maxim Dlugy.

Dlugy was banned from Chess.com in 2017 after allegedly cheating on one of the titles, and was the first to suspect Borislav Ivanov of cheating with a device in his shoes in 2013.

Former chess prodigy Dlugy was also jailed on charges of attempted embezzlement of $9 million, but he was later acquitted of all charges.

Carlsen was interviewed by a reporter in Oslow, and questioned about his thoughts on the bizarre claims of cheating.

The chess genius said: ‘Unfortunately I can’t speak specifically about that, but people can draw their own conclusions and they certainly have.

“I have to say I’m very impressed with Niemann’s game and I think his mentor Maxim Dlugy must do a great job.”

With Neimann’s recent loss, Carlsen will now face Vincent Keymer in the semi-finals, and if he wins, he will face either Liem or Argun Erigaisi.

Carlsen stunned chess fanatics when he resigned from a rematch against Niemann after just a single move in the online Julius Baer Generation Cup

Carlsen stunned chess fanatics when he resigned from a rematch against Niemann after just a single move in the online Julius Baer Generation Cup

Carlsen stunned chess fanatics when he resigned from a rematch against Niemann after just a single move in the online Julius Baer Generation Cup

He has now declined to say in an interview whether he believes Niemann cheated on both of their games

He has now declined to say in an interview whether he believes Niemann cheated on both of their games

He has now declined to say in an interview whether he believes Niemann cheated on both of their games

He added that he thought cheating in the sport was “easy” but that he “wouldn’t recommend it”, however “tempting” it may be.

Carlsen also said he would “probably” say a little more about the whole situation as the entire tournament draws to a close.

During a preliminary round of the online tournament, Carlsen surprised the announcers when he made a single move with black before admitting defeat and logging out. The week before, he left an over-the-board tournament after losing to the Niemann.

Announcer Tania Sachdev said during Carlsen’s disappearance act that it was “unprecedented” and said he “made a really big statement” by refusing to play Niemann.

It follows San Francisco-born Niemann’s win over Norwegian Carlsen – while the teenager played black – at the Sinquefield Cup on September 4.

FIDE, the world’s governing body for chess, condemned Carlsen’s actions, saying “his actions affect the reputation of his peers, sporting results and could ultimately harm our game.”

“We are convinced that there were better ways to deal with this situation.”

Dlugy, pictured, was banned from Chess.com in 2017 after allegedly cheating on one of the titles Tuesdays

Dlugy, pictured, was banned from Chess.com in 2017 after allegedly cheating on one of the titles Tuesdays

Dlugy, pictured, was banned from Chess.com in 2017 after allegedly cheating on one of the titles Tuesdays

When Carlsen pulled out of the tournament in St. Louis without explanation, he posted a cryptic Tweet saying, “I’ve withdrawn from the tournament. I have always enjoyed playing in the @STLChessClub and hope to come back in the future.”

Along with the tweet, he posted a cryptic video of football manager Jose Mourinho saying: ‘When I speak, I’m in big trouble.’

Mourinho spoke at a press conference after a game in which his team is said to have lost due to questionable decisions by officials.

Carlsen had played 53 classic games without a loss and had won the cup twice in the past decade, but had never withdrawn from an ongoing event.

Chess.com has declined to invite Niemann to Chess.com Global Championship, a $1 million event that begins with online qualifiers and culminates in an eight-player final in Toronto, following the controversy.

Niemann has furiously denied using vibrating anal beads to get tips on how to play - he said he would 'undress' if needed

Niemann has furiously denied using vibrating anal beads to get tips on how to play - he said he would 'undress' if needed

Niemann has furiously denied using vibrating anal beads to get tips on how to play – he said he would ‘undress’ if needed

When Carlsen pulled out of the tournament in St. Louis without explanation, he posted a cryptic Tweet saying, “I've withdrawn from the tournament.  I have always enjoyed playing in the @STLChessClub and hope to come back in the future'

When Carlsen pulled out of the tournament in St. Louis without explanation, he posted a cryptic Tweet saying, “I've withdrawn from the tournament.  I have always enjoyed playing in the @STLChessClub and hope to come back in the future'

When Carlsen pulled out of the tournament in St. Louis without explanation, he posted a cryptic Tweet saying, “I’ve withdrawn from the tournament. I have always enjoyed playing in the @STLChessClub and hope to come back in the future’

Carlsen also said he would “probably” say a little more about the whole situation when the whole tournament comes to a close

Niemann has furiously denied using vibrating anal beads to get tips on how to play. The teenage star said, “I’ve never cheated in an over-the-board game. If they want me to undress completely, I will.

‘I do not care. Because I know I’m clean. If you want me to play in a closed box with no electronic transmission, I don’t care. I’m here to win and that’s my goal no matter what.’

But critics note that his Elo rating, which measures the strength of chess players, shot to 2701 after his win over Carlsen, from just 2484 in January 2021, a staggering increase that some find unlikely.

And Niemann has admitted to cheating in online chess tournaments as a kid, saying he deeply regrets it.

In an online match when he was 12, he said that one of his friends brought an iPad with a “chess engine” program that offered the most likely path to victory.

The person playing Niemann couldn’t see him and so was unaware of what was happening.

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