Locals reveal parts of Australia paying $9 for milk and $84 for instant coffee

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The parts of Australia where locals pay $9 for milk, $17 for salad and $84 for instant coffee as the cost of living crisis bites hard

  • Residents of remote places in Australia pay hefty price for groceries
  • A Northern Territory city sold a 2-liter milk bottle for a whopping $9.20
  • A salad mix in another city cost $17 – usually $2-3 at Coles in Sydney?
  • In 2020, a 1kg coffee can sold for $84 in Queensland, illustrating a major problem

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Rural communities are hardest hit by the cost of living in Australia, with milk going for up to $9 and a mixed salad pack for $17.

The exorbitant prices reflect the fact that remote stores have to foot the bill for rising freight costs, but a public health expert has also cited the monopolies that exist in some cities to charge “whatever they want.”

Examples of the colossal price increases were seen in two separate remote places in the Northern Territory in April and June this year.

A receipt for a 2-liter Pura milk was posted on social media showing that a buyer had purchased it for $9.20 in April from a shop in Kaltukatjara, southwest of Alice Springs.

A receipt (pictured) shows a shopper was charged $9.20 at a remote Northern Territory community for a 2-liter milk bottle

A receipt (pictured) shows a shopper was charged $9.20 at a remote Northern Territory community for a 2-liter milk bottle

The same daily basic brand costs about $3 in major brand stores in major cities in Australia

The same daily basic brand costs about $3 in major brand stores in major cities in Australia

The same daily basic brand costs about $3 in major brand stores in major cities in Australia

The dairy product is offered for $3.10 at supermarkets in major cities.

A 2021 Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance report on the Northern Territory food summit found that isolated communities had to spend 56 percent more on food than those living in cities.

Donna Donzow of the EON Foundation, which helps indigenous communities to get good quality products, told 7NEWS.com.au the prices can be unusually high.

“The cost of a mixed salad pack was $17,” Ms. Donzow said after visiting Minyerri, a town southeast of Katherine in the Northern Territory.

A mixed salad pack (pictured, a variety from a Woolworths store) sold for $17 in June at a remote location near Katherine in the Northern Territory

A mixed salad pack (pictured, a variety from a Woolworths store) sold for $17 in June at a remote location near Katherine in the Northern Territory

A mixed salad pack (pictured, a variety from a Woolworths store) sold for $17 in June at a remote location near Katherine in the Northern Territory

It highlights the cost of living battle facing some regional communities, where an image was featured on social media a coffee can that sells for $84.09 in a 2020 post.

The 1kg Nescafe coffee product was caught in a remote supermarket in far north Queensland.

Caroline de Mori, CEO of the EON Foundation, said there is a lack of cheap and fresh food in supermarkets in remote areas.

“You end up paying $12 for a brown broccoli,” Mrs. de Mori said. ‘By the time it all gets to’ [to remote towns] it’s moldy and not fresh, so it’s not necessarily an option.

A 1kg coffee can was available in a remote Queensland town for a whopping $84.09, according to this 2020 post (pictured)

A 1kg coffee can was available in a remote Queensland town for a whopping $84.09, according to this 2020 post (pictured)

A 1kg coffee can was available in a remote Queensland town for a whopping $84.09, according to this 2020 post (pictured)

“This means we’re seeing astronomically higher rates of disease and health problems in these communities, and it’s only going to get worse.”

Ms de Mori added that people have switched to processed food because it is a cheaper option.

Transport subsidies and rules for shop owners who operate monopolies in some cities have been proposed as solutions for the locals living in these areas.

The expensive items follow other social media posts of rising food prices, including one from a Brisbane customer who saw a cabbage selling for $17.99 a head.

Recent floods on Australia’s east coast damaging crops, coupled with rising fuel costs from Russia’s bloody Ukraine war, have pushed up the cost of living in Australia – and green vegetables are among the hardest hit.

Weekly commodities that have risen the most in price over the past year were cited in data accompanying last week’s announcement that inflation is at its highest level in two decades.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), vegetables, fruits, breakfast cereals, bread, eggs, oils, butter and margarines have risen sharply in price over the past year.

The ABS released its quarterly figures (CPI) – the main measure of inflation – last week, with an increase of 6.1 percent over the past year.

The town where the milk was bought (pictured, Kaltukatjara, southwest of Alice Springs) is one of the remote communities where food prices have skyrocketed

The town where the milk was bought (pictured, Kaltukatjara, southwest of Alice Springs) is one of the remote communities where food prices have skyrocketed

The town where the milk was bought (pictured, Kaltukatjara, southwest of Alice Springs) is one of the remote communities where food prices have skyrocketed

A confrontational chart illustrates the alarming rise in the cost of basic groceries, with vegetables, cereals and other household items topping the list of sharp price increases

A confrontational chart illustrates the alarming rise in the cost of basic groceries, with vegetables, cereals and other household items topping the list of sharp price increases

A confrontational chart illustrates the alarming rise in the cost of basic groceries, with vegetables, cereals and other household items topping the list of sharp price increases

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