Orgasm pain: Woman, 34, suffered ‘insidious’ foot pain whenever she climaxed

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How one woman’s pain really came and went: Woman, 34, suffered ‘insidious’ foot pain when she had an orgasm

  • Canadian woman suffered ‘sharp’ pain in her foot when she ejaculated
  • Doctors found she had a pinched nerve that caused pain during intercourse
  • She received physiotherapy and sexual counseling to relieve the pain

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Anyone with chronic pain knows that there are certain triggers — moving too suddenly, eating the wrong thing, or a change in temperature.

But doctors have revealed how a Canadian woman was struck by “sharp,” sudden pain in her foot every time she had an orgasm.

During what is meant to be one of the most pleasurable sensations a person can feel, the 34-year-old endured 20 seconds of constant pain.

She told doctors about the phenomenon after five months, when it started ruining her and her husband’s sex lives and straining their marriage.

The patient was found to have a pinched nerve in her pelvis that ran down her leg to the arch of her foot which was activated when she climaxed.

A 34-year-old woman from Canada had 'sharp' pain in the arch of her right foot when she had an orgasm

A 34-year-old woman from Canada had ‘sharp’ pain in the arch of her right foot when she had an orgasm

What is Dysorgasmia?

Having cramps during sexual climax is known as dysorgasmia.

The shooting pains usually occur in the abdomen and are usually caused by muscles in the pelvic floor contracting quickly and pressing on nearby nerves.

Endometriosis, in which tissue similar to the uterus grows in other parts of the body, and uterine fibroids — noncancerous tumors in the uterus — can also cause it.

Patients are usually given pelvic floor exercises to strengthen the muscles and prevent them from cramping during sex.

Couples therapy is also recommended if sexual health professionals believe the condition is caused or exacerbated by psychological problems.

Sometimes known as a ‘pinched’ or ‘pinched’ nerve, it occurs when the fibers are pressed by the surrounding tissue, causing pain, tingling, or numbness.

The woman, from Vancouver, was referred to a physiotherapist who was able to heal her bizarre condition over three months through various exercises.

But she suffered long-term psychological damage and went to sex therapy with her husband to rekindle their ailing love lives.

The story was revealed in the medical journal Sexual Medicine.

The woman was referred to a gynecologist where she complained of sharp pain in the medial arch — the raised part of the foot that runs from the heel to the forefoot — when she had an orgasm.

It occurred when she had sex with “single or multiple orgasms.”

But she had an otherwise normal libido and her orgasms and arousal levels were regular.

Doctors gave her ultrasounds to examine her pelvis, but couldn’t find anything wrong at first.

She was referred to a physical therapist who took her through motions to test the tightness of several nerves, identifying the pelvis as where the pinched nerve was.

Ultrasound then revealed that her saphenous nerve was trapped near the ligament that attached the oblique muscles to the pelvis and groin.

The nerve, which runs from the inside of the hip down the leg, was injured in a cesarean section three years earlier.

She was referred to a physiotherapist from Diane Lee and Associates in Surrey, and received therapy to relieve her pain and learned pelvic floor exercises to free the nerve.

But despite the pain being completely relieved, she still associated sex with pain in her head, so she and her husband went to therapy to ease her fears.

The Christian couple, who had not had sex before marriage, were taught to communicate what they wanted from each other in ways they hadn’t before.

After five sessions, the woman said she felt more loved and desired by her husband than ever before — even before the pain started.

The West Coast Center for Sex Therapy team said the combination of physical therapy and sex therapy led to a full recovery.

They wrote, “Sex therapy gave this motivated couple an improved sex life beyond their sexual state prior to the introduction of pain at orgasm.”

While foot pain during orgasm is extremely rare, in general, having cramps after sex is a well-known condition called dysorgasmia.

The shooting pains usually occur in the abdomen and are usually caused by muscles in the pelvic floor contracting quickly and pressing on nearby nerves.

Endometriosis, in which tissue similar to the uterus grows in other parts of the body, and uterine fibroids — noncancerous tumors in the uterus — can also cause it.

Patients are usually given pelvic floor exercises to strengthen the muscles and prevent them from cramping during sex.

Couples therapy is also recommended if sexual health professionals believe the condition is caused or exacerbated by psychological problems.

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