Peter FitzSimons’ Australian Republican Movement causes stir with weird lizard Twitter post

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Peter FitzSimons’ Republican group stuns Australia with bizarre lizard post: ‘I am increasingly convinced this is a monarchist front’

  • Australian Republican Movement Steps Up Operations After Queen’s Death
  • The movement’s latest tweet has attracted a lot of attention for a bizarre reason
  • Peter Fitzsimon’s group posted a photo that many associated with a conspiracy
  • ARM’s CEO said connections between the post and conspiracies were ‘absurd’

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Peter FitzSimons’ republican group has confused Australians with a quirky lizard-focused social media post – as it gives new impetus to the country to cut ties with the monarchy.

The Australian Republican Movement, chaired by the Sydney-based commentator and author, called on Australians to “think about the future of the nation” in a tweet featuring a photo of the iconic outback lizard, the Thorny Devil, on Friday.

The organization wrote: ‘We now have a King of Australia. Charles is not one of us and we have not chosen to be our head of state. We hear you and agree that the concept of an Australian king is both disturbing and strange. Now is the time for us to think about the future of our country.

But it was the strange selection of photos of the Australian lizard sitting on a sand dune near the post that caught the attention of readers.

The Australian Republican Movement, chaired by the Sydney-based commentator and author, called on Australians to “think about the future of the nation” in a tweet featuring a photo of the iconic outback lizard, the Thorny Devil, on Friday.

Peter FitzSimons' (pictured with wife Lisa Wilkinson) Australian Republican Movement has stepped up their campaign after the Queen's death

Peter FitzSimons' (pictured with wife Lisa Wilkinson) Australian Republican Movement has stepped up their campaign after the Queen's death

Peter FitzSimons’ (pictured with wife Lisa Wilkinson) Australian Republican Movement has stepped up their campaign after the Queen’s death

One Twitter user was so annoyed by the post that he joked, “(I am) more and more convinced they are a monarchist front.”

A cybersecurity entrepreneur couldn’t wrap his head around the choice of mascot.

‘Hard to find the visual metaphor here…long live the lizard king? Don’t step on me? Aussie wildlife is bad** and sometimes it’s just fun to point that out.”

A journalist read deeper into the iconography.

“An inspired decision to make the majestic Thorny Devil the official mascot of the republic movement,” wrote Josh Butler.

Others made cracks about “lizard people.” In science fiction and radical conspiracy theories, the idea that “lizard people” secretly own great world leaders is a commonly used trope.

A prankster retweeted the post, saying, “Are they seriously suggesting we just go with a different species of reptile as our head of state?” and retweeted the post.

One Twitter user was so stunned by the tweet that he suggested the ARM was actually a monarchist front

One Twitter user was so stunned by the tweet that he suggested the ARM was actually a monarchist front

One Twitter user was so stunned by the tweet that he suggested the ARM was actually a monarchist front

Sandy Biar, the CEO of the Australian Republican Movement, told Daily Mail Australia that any connection between the statue and reptilian conspiracy theories was “absurd.”

“The image clearly had nothing to do with those conspiracy theories.”

She said the movement was ramping up operations after respecting the mourning period for the late queen and her service to the country.

“But we now have a new king whom we have not chosen, who has resumed his duties as king.

“Charles III is now moving forward and it is now time for us as a nation to have a serious discussion about our future and why we should be independent from the British monarchy,” said Ms Biar.

“Our head of state should be an Australian, elected by Australians and accountable to us.”

The Queen was much loved during her reign, but many pro-Republican Australians have hoped the country’s attachment to the monarchy would break upon her passing.

But instead of growing support for the monarchy, recent polls by Yougov and Roy Morgan after the Queen’s death show that the majority of Australians want the country to remain under a royal head of state.

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