Pregnant woman tests positive for monkeypox in America

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A pregnant woman has tested positive for monkey pox in the United States, a chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has revealed.

The woman has now given birth to her child, who does not appear to have gotten the rash-causing virus from the mother.

CDC released limited information about the case, including where in the US the woman was based. It is also unclear when the woman became infected, or exactly when she gave birth.

Health officials said both “did well,” but the country’s top infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, warned on Tuesday that pregnant women could be at “high risk” from the virus.

A maternity doctor told DailyMail.com that women in the early stages of pregnancy are most at risk for monkey pox. The mother may have been in the final stages of her pregnancy when she was infected, as she recently gave birth.

The newborn was given immunoglobin, an infusion of antibodies capable of fighting diseases, including monkey pox, officials said. It is not clear what treatment the mother received.

It is the first infection identified in a pregnant woman in the United States, and comes after America registered the first two infections in children last week. The pediatric cases were unrelated and were detected in California and Washington DC

There are currently 3,591 monkeypox infections confirmed in the Americas – the second largest outbreak in the world after 3,738 cases in Spain.

Pictured above is the spread of monkey pox cases in the United States. New York currently has the most infections, followed by California and Illinois

The US currently has the second largest monkeypox outbreak in the world, behind only Spain, which was one of the first countries to be hit by the disease

The US currently has the second largest monkeypox outbreak in the world, behind only Spain, which was one of the first countries to be hit by the disease

The US currently has the second largest monkeypox outbreak in the world, behind only Spain, which was one of the first countries to be hit by the disease

America has discovered its first case of monkeypox in a pregnant woman in the United States.  Pictured above are images of cells infected with monkeypox virus (red dots)

America has discovered its first case of monkeypox in a pregnant woman in the United States.  Pictured above are images of cells infected with monkeypox virus (red dots)

America has discovered its first case of monkeypox in a pregnant woman in the United States. Pictured above are images of cells infected with monkeypox virus (red dots)

dr. John Brooks, the CDC’s chief of medical department in the monkeypox response, revealed the matter Saturday during a webinar with the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

“There has been a case of a pregnant woman giving birth,” Brooks said.

‘The newborn was given the IG prophylactically (given immune globin to prevent disease). Both mother and baby are doing well.’

CDC officials confirmed the matter to DailyMail.com. Their website warns that pregnant women are “more likely to become seriously ill or die” from monkey pox.

Timeline of monkey pox in the United States

1958: Monkeypox is discovered when an outbreak of a smallpox-like disease occurs in monkeys kept for research.

1970: The first human case of the disease has been recorded in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It was later discovered in a number of other Central and West African countries.

2003: America’s former largest monkeypox outbreak occurs. A total of 47 people have been infected after contact with prairie dogs that contracted the disease on a farm.

July, 2021: Case of monkey pox discovered in the US in a citizen who had recently returned from Nigeria.

Nov 2021: Monkeypox is detected on another US resident who recently returned from Nigeria.

May 2022: A man in Massachusetts is diagnosed with monkey pox, which is the first case in the current outbreak. There are now more than 3,000 cases across the country.

July, 2022: Two children and a pregnant woman test positive for monkeypox as the disease spreads to other groups. The children were in California and traveling through Washington DC, it was not clear where the woman was.

Fauci – the top infectious disease expert in the US – warned in an interview yesterday that pregnant women were among those at higher risk for monkey pox.

He told NPR: ‘We need to understand the mode of transmission, the manifestations, also the risk to people such as children and pregnant women. There really is a big risk.

“Thank goodness we only have a report of two cases in children at the moment, but they are all high-risk groups.”

dr. Daniel Roshan, a maternal-fetal medicine expert at Rosh Maternal and Fetal Medicine in New York, told the DailyMail.com that pregnant women and their babies were at greatest risk of monkey pox early in pregnancy because the baby’s organs are developing. were still developing, increasing the risk. of birth defects.

In the later stages, babies are more at risk of contracting the virus because more blood flows to them, but less likely to have birth defects because most organs are already developed.

He told DailyMail.com: ‘If they get the virus in the first ten weeks of pregnancy since the baby is just starting to develop, there is a higher risk of birth defects.

‘[But] in the third trimester there is more blood flow from the placenta to the fetus and it is easier to contract the virus.’

Pregnant women who get monkey pox can pass it on to their babies through the placenta in the womb. It can also be transmitted once a child is born through close contact – such as hugs – and there is a risk of it being passed through breast milk.

Roshan said immunoglobin would be given to a pregnant woman who had contracted monkey pox to help fight the infection.

When asked how the parent became infected, Roshan said it was likely through close contact with an infected patient.

He advised pregnant women to follow the ‘normal protocol’ to avoid contamination. “I would say they should be careful with the contact,” he said. “Stay away from people with a rash or fever and follow personal hygiene.”

The CDC says that babies born to pregnant women should be washed immediately after birth with wipes and soapy water.

In the guidelines published this week, they add that doctors would then have to decide whether to administer a vaccine to the child or an antiviral drug.

Babies then need to be monitored for 21 days — during which time they need to be cared for by a caregiver or family member — to make sure they haven’t contracted the virus.

Infected mothers should stay away from their children until all monkeypox lesions have flaked off and the scabs have fallen off.

dr.  John Brooks, chief medical officer in the CDC's monkeypox response, revealed the case in a pregnant woman during a webinar on Saturday

dr.  John Brooks, chief medical officer in the CDC's monkeypox response, revealed the case in a pregnant woman during a webinar on Saturday

dr.  Anthony Fauci, America's leading infectious disease expert, said pregnant women are at 'high risk' from the virus

dr.  Anthony Fauci, America's leading infectious disease expert, said pregnant women are at 'high risk' from the virus

dr. John Brooks, the CDC’s chief of medical department in the monkeypox response, revealed the case in a pregnant woman during a webinar on Saturday. dr. Anthony Fauci, America’s leading infectious disease expert, said pregnant women are at ‘high risk’ from the virus

Medical literature shows that monkeypox infections in pregnant women have previously led to miscarriage, stillbirth, early delivery and infection in the womb.

But it’s not clear how common these are, because so few pregnant women have been infected before.

A 2017 study that followed four pregnant women with the disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo found two miscarriages in their babies and one was fetal death.

Smallpox, the now eradicated cousin of monkeypox, was also more serious in pregnant women.

Last week, the CDC revealed that America’s first two cases of monkeypox had been detected in children as the virus spread to other groups.

One is a toddler from California, the other is a baby who was traveling through Washington DC when the case was discovered. Neither of them had contact with each other.

It is thought that both children likely contracted the virus through “household contacts,” including people they live with and visitors to their homes.

dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director of the CDC, said the children had both been in contact with gay or bisexual men — the community where most cases are discovered during the current outbreak.

They’ve been given the antiviral TPOXX, which can help keep an infection in its tracks by hindering the virus’s maturation.

Until now, monkeypox infections have occurred almost exclusively in gay or bisexual men.

But a top expert has warned that the virus has likely already spread to other groups but has not yet been detected in them due to a lack of testing.

The World Health Organization warns that pregnant women are more at risk for monkey pox.

Scientific studies suggest that between three and ten percent of children infected with monkeypox die from the disease, depending on the type they contract.

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