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The five career-damaging moves according to a recruiter Roxanne Calder: how to get your dream job

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A top recruiter has listed the career-damaging mistakes Australians make, including office collapse, not showing up in the ‘post-pandemic’ world and abuse of power.

Recruiting specialist and Employable author, Roxanne Calder, says there are five key mistakes candidates make that have a lasting impact on their employability — and shared simple things they can do to boost their career prospects.

“Thanks to the large layoffs, it is currently a market for job seekers, but just because the tables have turned doesn’t mean you can leave your job in the blink of an eye for a better offer.” EST10 recruitment consultancy founder said.

“It’s about your reputation. How do you want to be remembered? That distinguishes those who make career-enhancing moves versus career-damaging moves.’

Recruitment specialist and Employable author, Roxanne Calder, says there are five key mistakes candidates make that have a lasting impact on their employability - and shared simple things they can do to boost their career prospects

Recruitment specialist and Employable author, Roxanne Calder, says there are five key mistakes candidates make that have a lasting impact on their employability – and shared simple things they can do to boost their career prospects

1. Leaving your job on bad terms

With the great resignation on everyone’s lips, this point has never been more acute. It doesn’t matter how horrible your boss or work environment is or how dissatisfied you may feel; always resign with grace.

How you keep yourself in these last few weeks will protect your reputation and career for years to come. Give the correct notice period according to your contract. Speak directly to your boss, don’t leave a message, don’t text and do so with respect, no aggression or passive-aggressive vibes.

Don’t mispronounce your boss or organization and don’t post on social media. Work out your cancellation as if you were never leaving. You never know who knows who, and with LinkedIn and unseen networking it’s no longer six degrees of separation, it’s probably just three.

Meltdowns are a clear sign of emotional immaturity, sending out the message,

Meltdowns are a clear sign of emotional immaturity, sending out the message, “I can’t rely on this person.” Instead, apply self-control and work on your critical responses, disconnect, analyze and resolve with composure

2. Disclosure of Confidential Information

If the disclosure is significant, you could find yourself in court and the legal system to be watched publicly. Understand confidential information and intellectual property.

Everything to do with customer/customer information, company policies, business terms, benefits, and even salaries falls into this category. Whether you work at home or in a cafe, be extremely vigilant about protecting company information when working remotely.

opinion poll

What is the most annoying mistake?

  • 1. Leaving your job on bad terms 11 votes
  • 2. Disclosure of Confidential Information 19 votes
  • 3. Tantrums, meltdowns, hissing attacks and the like 57 votes
  • 4. Not to be seen 11 votes
  • 5. Abuse of Power 33 votes

How visible is the screen of your laptop, are there company papers lying around, can you be heard on your video call or mobile? It doesn’t matter if it’s your husband or the cafe owner. It is a breach of confidentiality.

Such slips have serious consequences and endanger your job and career.

3. Tantrums, meltdowns, hissing attacks and the like

I’m not talking about micro-stress disturbances or having a bad day. I am referring to the episodes in which employees walk away, throw things away, threaten to lay off, deadlines, thwart projects, etc., usually caused by stress and pressure.

I’m sure there are times when we would all love to do this. But we don’t. It is counterproductive, unprofessional and a major headache for managers.

It is also a clear sign of emotional immaturity, sending the message, ‘I can’t rely on this person’. Instead, apply self-control and work on your critical responses, dissolving, analyzing, and resolving with composure.

Manage timelines better and if you’re concerned about a deadline or workload, let your boss know before it becomes critical.

How do you write the perfect email intro without being hair-raising?

Start with something personal – ‘How’s the golf? Lately no avoiding fours’

If you haven’t spoken to the recipient in a while, confirm the time – ‘I realize it’s been a while since we’ve been in touch. Been very busy with X lately. How are you?’

Just ask how they are – ‘How are you? I hope you had a good weekend’

Start with something positive and don’t mention the pandemic

Don’t waffle – write one sentence per paragraph

People who abuse their power feel entitled to do so, usually because of their position and sense of importance.  They don't see the consequences of their behavior or think they are immune to it

People who abuse their power feel entitled to do so, usually because of their position and sense of importance. They don’t see the consequences of their behavior or think they are immune to it

4. Not to be seen

Most poignant in our post-pandemic world. The benefits of working remotely are undeniable, but come with a career cost if not navigated correctly.

Strong work relationships and networks critical to career success are negatively impacted when working remotely. The consequences are slow to realize and, if left too late, a tough challenge to retrieve.

Your achievements and efforts also run the risk of not being recognized. Instead, take the opportunity to be in the office every week if possible. Attend all virtual meetings with your camera on.

Contribute to each session and raise your hand for projects outside your normal domain. The idea is not just to maintain your network, but also to nurture and grow it. It will take effort on your part, but if you do the opposite, regression and career opportunities will be lost.

5. Abuse of Power

Roxanne Calder's book Employable is out now

Roxanne Calder’s book Employable is out now

It is not only managers who have the power. We all have some form of power in our roles. You can be the administrator dealing with the company’s suppliers or the chairman. How you handle it says it all.

People who abuse their power feel entitled to do so, usually because of their position and sense of importance. They don’t see the consequences of their behavior or think they are immune to it.

Apply Empathy and Self Awareness. See yourself as others might, ie through their lens and not through yours. Cognitive empathy allows you to understand and accept the opinions of others.

It’s about breaking free from the need to be right and accepting human differences. Understand the impact you have, positive or negative.

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