Workers are still only going into the office an average of 1.5 days a week, says survey

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British workers still go to the office on average 1.5 days a week, despite the pandemic coming to an end, a study shows.

Consultancy Advanced Workplace Associates, which advises the Cabinet Office, NatWest and Network Rail, surveyed 43 offices across the UK in June and July and found that only 13% come in on Friday.

Overall average attendance was 29%, peaking in the middle of the week at 39% among the workforce of nearly 50,000 people.

Before the pandemic, workers went to the office about 3.8 days a week to take jobs in banking, energy, engineering, healthcare, insurance and technology.

But data published in May by the Office for National Statistics also shows that three in four adults in the UK now travel to work at some point during the week – up from two-thirds in April.

UK workers still go to the office an average of 1.5 days a week, research shows as people increasingly enjoy agile working (stock image)

UK workers still go to the office an average of 1.5 days a week, research shows as people increasingly enjoy agile working (stock image)

Consultancy Advanced Workplace Associates surveyed 43 offices in the UK in June and July and found that only 13% come in on Fridays

Consultancy Advanced Workplace Associates surveyed 43 offices in the UK in June and July and found that only 13% come in on Fridays

Consultancy Advanced Workplace Associates surveyed 43 offices in the UK in June and July and found that only 13% come in on Fridays

About 75 percent of adults surveyed between May 11 and 22 said they had traveled to work in the past seven days, either alone or while working part of their time at home. This is an increase of 66 percent of those surveyed from April 13 to 24.

The proportion of people working from home at some point in the week has broadly remained the same, at 37 percent in mid-May compared to 36 percent in mid-April.

Meanwhile, Advanced Workplace Associates also claimed that the trend continued in the It also surveyed 36 offices in 12 other countries, about 27,000 people.

People work on average 1.4 days a week, compared to 3.8 days a week before the pandemic. There was a peak attendance of 35% midweek and 26% average.

While North America still allocated the highest number of desks per person, 96, compared to 79 in the UK, it had the fewest office visits.

The US and Canada fell to an average turnout of 21%, while Latin America was 19% and the EU 27%.

Banks, healthcare and engineering use more than 50% desk usage on average and have a high peak usage, while technology, energy and logistics have the lowest usage at about 32%.

The Conservative government has long been fighting against working from home, with Jacob Rees-Mogg swearing last week to work hard on ‘flexitime’ work arrangements.

Liz Truss (pictured during a Sky News debate) vowed to get more officials back to office after it emerged many Whitehall offices are still empty

Liz Truss (pictured during a Sky News debate) vowed to get more officials back to office after it emerged many Whitehall offices are still empty

Liz Truss (pictured during a Sky News debate) vowed to get more officials back to office after it emerged many Whitehall offices are still empty

The government's efficiency minister has demanded an official review of the scheme by Whitehall, which he believes is likely to be wasting taxpayers' money

The government's efficiency minister has demanded an official review of the scheme by Whitehall, which he believes is likely to be wasting taxpayers' money

The government’s efficiency minister has demanded an official review of the scheme by Whitehall, which he believes is likely to be wasting taxpayers’ money

Rees-Mogg said there is 'a culture of waste' in Whitehall, fueling indoctrination that is 'designed to turn people against each other or talk the country down'

Rees-Mogg said there is 'a culture of waste' in Whitehall, fueling indoctrination that is 'designed to turn people against each other or talk the country down'

Rees-Mogg said there is ‘a culture of waste’ in Whitehall, fueling indoctrination that is ‘designed to turn people against each other or talk the country down’

This allows civil servants to work about five hours less than the national weekly average, often remotely and on a full-time salary.

The government’s efficiency minister demanded an official review of the scheme by Whitehall, which he believes is likely to be wasting taxpayers’ money.

Flexitime allows officials to dictate their own start and end times, provided they work mid-day core hours and work 37.5 hours a week, and entitle them to significant overtime compensation.

He is also against working from home and walking around Whitehall inspecting government offices for people who are out of the office.

Liz Truss pledged earlier this month to get more officials back to office after it emerged that many Whitehall offices are still empty.

She supported the efforts of cabinet minister Jacob Rees-Mogg to curb the work-from-home culture in the civil service.

The Foreign Secretary, who previously suggested flexible working ‘should become the norm’, took a vow when figures from the Cabinet Office showed that just over half of Whitehall’s desks were occupied in the week of July 25. .

The biggest culprits were the Scotland Office at 27 percent and Miss Truss’ own ward at 34 percent. The numbers decrease as the weeks go by.

Miss Truss said, “I support the work Jacob Rees-Mogg has done…and I’ll be looking very closely at it.”

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